tom13c No Comments

The Japanese government blames the translation of Shinzo Abe’s speech

Through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the translation agency employed by the Japanese Government has received a severe reprimand after a translation deemed erroneous, of the speech by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the last World Economic Forum in Davos.

Through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the translation agency employed by the Japanese Government has received a severe reprimand after a translation deemed erroneous, of the speech by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the last World Economic Forum in Davos.

When Shinzo Abe was interviewed on the tension between his country and China over territorial and historical issues, he made a connection to the situation in Germany and Great Britain on the eve of the First World War and the consequences that followed. The translator used the term similar situation” to transcribe the Prime Minister’s words. This fueled the ire of China, which severed all dialogue with Japan in 2012, despite the economic exchanges between the two countries. In addition, the former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger warned the public about the resurgence of conflict between the East Asian powers.

According to the translation made by AFP, the Prime Minister did not use the term “similar situation”. However, he did in fact invoke the dispute between Germany and Britain, finishing his remarks with the impacts of a possible disagreement with China. On this point, the tension between the two powers concerns a territorial but also historic dispute because of the visit by the head of the Japanese government to the Yasukuni Shrine which is considered as a remnant of Japan’s fascist past.

More details

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *